As a new parent there will be times when you simply don’t have all the answers. Don’t fret, everything’s very new and there’s lots to learn.

So for those occasions when you could do with a helping hand and some useful advice, we’re here. Whatever your concerns or questions – from Braxton Hicks to fussy little feeders, we’d love to hear from you.

Our helpful and friendly Careline is just a call or a click away, every day of the week (except bank holidays), from 9am-5.30pm. And because they’re also mums and dads, just like you, they’ll understand every worry or concern. So give them a call on 0800 212 991 or email heinzbaby@uk.hjheinz.com

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9am-5.30pm, every weekday (except bank holidays)

Your top 6 most common questions:

  • My 13 month old is teething and refusing to eat much in the way of solid food. Will… My 13 month old is teething and refusing to eat much in the way of solid food. Will the smoother baby jars / pouches work as a substitute nutrition wise until she gets her appetite back?

    I'm sorry your little one is suffering with teething troubles.… read more

    I'm sorry your little one is suffering with teething troubles. It's a distressing time for you and her but hang in there because it will pass soon.

    If your daughter is off her food then it's ok to try purees if they're easier for her to eat. Just make sure you give her a couple at a time, as they tend to be smaller portion sizes than typical toddler meals. You could also try feeding some foods cold e.g. fruit desserts or pots. If they've been in the fridge till they're cold, it might soothe sore gums.

    Alternatively, she may like to relieve the pain by chewing on a carrot stick or breadstick, so offer some finger foods like this to she if they help.

    As soon as she is no longer teething, move back onto normal toddler foods, as it's important to offer foods with a more adult texture to help her learn to chew and eat the same foods as you.

    Good luck and do let us know how you get on.

  • My 13 month old has started chewing his food then spitting it out. Can you help? My 13 month old has started chewing his food then spitting it out. Can you help?

    It may be that your little one has had enough to eat. Toddlers… read more

    It may be that your little one has had enough to eat. Toddlers usually will eat enough calories to get what they need for growth, so don't try to persuade him to eat more when he doesn't want to.

    Try not to worry but offer lots of nutritious foods and snacks regularly and let your toddler decide when he has had enough to eat.

  • How much Vitamin D does my 12 month old require? How much Vitamin D does my 12 month old require?

    The Department of Health recommends that all young children be… read more

    The Department of Health recommends that all young children be given vitamin D supplements from the age of 1 year up to 5 years of age. There are few food sources of vitamin D so it is not easy to provide the 7 micrograms a day that 1-2 year olds require.

    Vitamin D is present in fortified follow on formula and fortified cereals and there are also small amounts in eggs. Vitamin D can also be made when the skin is exposed to sunlight. However, with concerns over sun damage to the skin and the dark winters, there may be a risk of vitamin D deficiency in some infants. It's therefore important to provide a balanced diet with a suitable vitamin D supplement for toddlers from 1-5 years. Speak to your health visitor about this and they can advise you on the best supplements to use.

  • How and when should I offer finger foods? How and when should I offer finger foods?

    Liven up your little one's food adventure by introducing finger… read more

    Liven up your little one's food adventure by introducing finger foods at around 9 months. Even if your baby has no teeth yet, you can encourage chewing by offering some interesting bites. Try giving your little one finger foods like Heinz Biscotti, Farley's Mini Rusks, cooked carrots or peeled and sliced fruit, such as banana and pear. Then, when your baby is ready, you can move on to more challenging textures like pieces of cooked chicken breast or flakes of fish (though ensure you remove all bones).

    Here are some other finger foods your baby may like to try:

    • Toast
    • Bread soldiers
    • Pitta bread and chapatti
    • Rice cakes
    • Slices of soft, ripe, peeled fruit, including:
    • Bananas
    • Pears
    • Peaches
    • Melon
    • Cooked vegetable pieces, including:
    • Green beans
    • Broccoli
    • Cauliflower
    • Carrots
    • Courgette
    • Cubes of cheese
    • Cooked pasta shapes
  • Is there any nutritional benefit to giving my 13 month old son ham in his sandwiches… Is there any nutritional benefit to giving my 13 month old son ham in his sandwiches - I only give it to him occasionally as I don't think it is particularly good for you but it is the only food he will eat

    I know how difficult it can be when your little one will only… read more

    I know how difficult it can be when your little one will only eat a small range of foods. Rest assured, this fussy eating phase will pass in a while. Just continue to offer a wide range of foods and remember, it may take at least 8 different occasions of offering a food before your toddler will accept it. Have a look at my fussy eating article for some more information.

    Ham is a source of protein and some minerals like iron and zinc, however you do need to watch out for salt levels, so try not to give your son ham too often. You could try some chicken or turkey slices instead, or maybe a cheese spread but again, keep an eye on the salt levels.

  • My toddler is rejecting new foods? My toddler is rejecting new foods?

    From around 12 months, your baby may start to become suspicious… read more

    From around 12 months, your baby may start to become suspicious of new foods. This instinct is stronger in some toddlers than others, and may stem from a survival mechanism that protects your baby against eating something poisonous, related to the fact they are on the move.

    If your toddler starts refusing new foods, try not to panic. Keep calm and keep offering a variety of colourful, flavoursome foods. The more variety you offer, the more likely it is that all their nutritional requirements are being met.

    Any fussy eating should resolve itself with time and if your toddler was eating a varied diet beforehand, they are more likely to return to eating a wide variety of foods later.